Social Media in the Workplace

It’s insane to think about how social media has truly taken over the world we live in today. I believe people have overlooked how popular and world spread social media has become – especially for younger people who don’t realize they can’t go 10 minutes without checking their phones. But, now social media is tied into everything we do, whether it’s in our personal or professional lives. Companies need to create policies for workers now because it is just expected everyone interacts on social media. For example, Intel has a set of social media guidelines, and employees have to follow three main principles while working for Intel and being active on social media. I thought these three principles were great examples of what companies and employees can expect of each other.

1. Disclose

Their first principle is probably the most important in regards to legal terms. It’s important companies make sure employees are being truthful and transparent, or this can create legal issues if a company is being misrepresented online. I thought it was interesting that Intel pointed out that everything is quickly noticed on social media and how it’s nearly impossible to get away with dishonesty currently. I think this is one of the benefits of social media, using it as a quick check on people and companies to make sure everything is ethical and true.

2. Protect

I thought this principle was very interesting because I’ve never really thought about the issues of oversharing can bring, I’ve just thought of that as being annoying. It seems like common sense not to tell confidential information about your company on social media, but at the same time people forget about how public social media truly is. I also liked how Intel made the point to emphasis to not slam their competition because that’s not going to make them look any better.

3. Use Common Sense

Something that people always seem to forget while on social media. Intel emphasized how the lines between personal and professional, public and private are blurred on social media. I think this is something people need to be reminded constantly because unfortunately everything has become so intertwined it’s important people are able to find the perfect balance of it all.

Overall, I think these guidelines are extremely helpful and important for all companies to have. It’s obviously beneficial to the company, but I think people don’t realize how it is also beneficial to the employees. It’s a good thing to have to make sure employees are always thinking about what they are posting on social media. The environment on social media is so rapid that people post without thinking, but these types of guidelines make them think. Eventually, people will hopefully find the perfect balance of it all and know how to use social media properly.

 

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One thought on “Social Media in the Workplace

  1. I like what you added in in the end, “It’s obviously beneficial to the company, but I think people don’t realize how it is also beneficial to the employees.” I think people should be less concerned about any restrictions that are put on their social media habits (by employers) and more concerned about their social media footprint they are leaving. Personally, I’m always very aware of what I post online because I know that whatever I post is a representation of my personal brand. People should focus more so on their own reputation and how they’d like to be viewed rather than obsessing over the idea of their social media posts being restricted by a contract. I really enjoyed your post and how you found a specific example of social media policies!

    Like

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